DCJ Grant Programs

The Division of Criminal Justice administers the following grants. For guidance and instructions related to applying for or managing a grant please visit the Grants Guidance & Resources page.

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Open & On-Going Funding Opportunities

Adam Walsh Act Implementation Grant Program (AWA)

Purpose of the Funds: The Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking(SMART) Support for the Adam Walsh Act Implementation Grant Program assists jurisdictions with developing and/or enhancing programs designed to implement the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA). SORNA (34 U.S.C. § 20901, Title I et seq.) was enacted to protect the public by establishing a comprehensive national system of standards for the registration and notification of convicted sex offenders.

Eligibility: Subawards are grant specified, this grant is not an open competitive funding opportunity.

Statutory Authority: Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act, 34 U.S.C. 20901 et seq. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.750

Managing your Grant: 

The AWA program is administered by the DCJ Sex Offender Management Unit.

Antiterrorism and Emergency Assistance Program (AEAP)

Purpose of the Funds: One-time Emergency Funding in response to the Shooting at the STEM School of Highlands Ranch, CO.

Eligibility: Subawards are grant specified, this grant is not an open competitive funding opportunity.

Statutory Authority: 34 U.S.C. § 20101(d)(5) and 34 U.S.C. 20105(b). Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.321

Managing Your Grant:  DCJ Grant Reporting Forms

The AEAP program is administered by the DCJ Office for Victims Programs (OVP).

Body Worn Cameras for Law Enforcement Officers Grant Program

Purpose of the Funds: The Body-worn Cameras for Law Enforcement Officers Grant Program was appropriated funds through this year’s Long Bill and by House Bill 21-1250 to help Colorado law enforcement agencies comply with the requirements of House Bill 21-1250 and Senate Bill 20-217. The Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice (OAJJA), a unit of DCJ within the Department of Public Safety, is administering the grant program. 

Eligibility: Colorado law enforcement agencies.

Statutory Authority: 24-31-902. Incident recordings - release - tampering - fine.
(1) (a) (I) By July 1, 2023, all local law enforcement agencies in the state and the Colorado State Patrol shall provide body-worn cameras for each peace officers of the law enforcement agency who interacts with members of the public. Law enforcement agencies may seek funding pursuant to Section 24-33.5-519.

Frequently Asked Questions

Managing your Grant: 

This grant program is administered by the Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance.

Coronavirus Emergency Supplemental Funding (CESF)

Purpose of the Funds: The Division of Criminal Justice Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (DCJ OAJJA) received federal funding to support both state and local governments/agencies via a broad range of criminal justice and law enforcement activities to prevent, prepare, and respond to the coronavirus.

Eligibility: Coronavirus Emergency Supplemental Funding is available for state and local units of government, such as law enforcement  agencies, jails, prisons, detention facilities, and other local organizations. We will also accept limited grant applications from non-profit organizations representing statewide associations of local law enforcement.  Non-profit organizations must demonstrate how the grant will address statewide priorities.  

Statutory Authority: FY20(BJA - CESF) Pub. L. No. 116-136, Div. B; 28 U.S.C. 530C. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.034

Managing your Grant:

This grant program is administered by the Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance.

Crime Victim Services Funds (CVS) - VOCA, VAWA, SASP, State VALE

Crime Victim Services Funds (CVS) grant programs include:

  • Victims of Crime Act Fund (VOCA)
  • Violence Against Women Act Fund (VAWA)
  • Sexual Assault Services Program (SASP) and
  • State Victim Assistance and Law Enforcement Program (State VALE)

Purpose of the Funds: The Crime Victim Services (CVS) Funds program distributes victim services grant funds in accordance with state and federal requirements and the intended use of the four grant programs.

Eligibility: Eligible applicants include: units of local government, criminal justice agencies, departments of state government, non-governmental non-profit victim services agencies, Indian Tribal governments, statewide crime victim services coalitions, and non-profit agencies that provide crime victim services.

Statutory Authority:

  • Victims of Crime Act Fund (VOCA) - 34 U.S.C. § 20103. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.575
  • Violence Against Women Act Fund (VAWA) - 34 U.S.C. §§ 10441, 10446–10451. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.588
  • Sexual Assault Services Program (SASP) - 34 U.S.C. § 12511.  Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.017
  • State Victim Assistance and Law Enforcement Program (State VALE) - C.R.S. §24-4.2-101 through §24-4.2-110. 

Managing your Grant

The CVS program is administered by the DCJ Office for Victims Programs (OVP). 

Delinquency Prevention and Young Offenders Intervention (DPI) Pilot Grant Program

    Purpose of the Funds: To award grants to eligible recipients for collaborative projects to reduce violence, crime, and delinquency among youth.

    The Colorado general assembly determined that a strategy to enhance delinquency prevention efforts and provide early intervention responses to those who have entered or are at risk of entering the juvenile justice system is necessary to prevent youth delinquency, reduce the impact on victims of youth crimes, and ensure that all young people in Colorado have an equal opportunity to prosper.  Therefore, the Delinquency Prevention and Young Offender Intervention Pilot Grant Program was established.  

    Eligibility: Units of government at the municipal, county, or city and county, and any agency that has experience working with children and youth crime prevention or intervention programs, an American Indian Tribe; or a nonprofit organization may apply to the Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance, Division of Criminal Justice, for a DPI grant. The DPI grant program strongly encourages coordinated efforts with multiple community-based partners.  This may include a local Collaborative Management Program described in section 24-1.9-102, and a local Juvenile Services Planning Committee created pursuant to section 19-2.5-302.

    Statutory Authority: Collaborative Management Program described in section 24-1.9-102, and a local Juvenile Services Planning Committee created pursuant to section 19-2.5-302.

    Managing your Grant:

    Additional information may be found on the Delinquency Prevention and Young Offenders Intervention Pilot Grant Program Information Page.

    The Delinquency Prevention and Young Offenders Intervention (DPI) Pilot Grant Program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

    Juvenile Diversion Program (DV)

    Purpose of the Funds: Per Colorado Statute, the goals of diversion are to prevent further involvement of a juvenile in the formal legal system (19-2-303 C.R.S.); provide eligible juveniles with cost-effective alternatives to adjudication that require the least amount of supervision and restrictive conditions necessary; reduce recidivism and improve positive outcomes for juveniles; and ensure appropriate services are available for all juveniles. 

    Juvenile diversion programs should, when possible, integrate restorative justice practices and utilize evidence-based practices to provide community-based alternatives to the formal court system for youth between the ages of 10-17, as an alternative to a petition filed or an adjudicatory hearing. Diversion programs should never deny diversion to a juvenile based on the juvenile's ability to pay, previous or current involvement with the Departments of Human or Social Services; age, race or ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or legal representation.

    Eligibility: The Colorado Children's Code establishes units of local government and non-governmental agencies as eligible agencies to receive these state funds.  Funds are allocated to each judicial district pursuant to CRS 19-2-303, based on a formula that consists of a percentage for juvenile-age population, poverty rate, and juvenile population per square mile.

    Statutory Authority: C.R.S. 19-2-303

    Managing your Grant:

    Additional information may be found on the State Juvenile Diversion Program (DV) information page.

    The DV program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA).

    Justice Assistance Grant (JAG)

      Purpose of the Funds: The purpose of the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program, offered through the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), is to promote working partnerships between federal, state, and local governments to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime and to improve the criminal justice system.

      Eligibility: Units of government at the municipal, county, and state level, including special districts may apply. The JAG program strongly encourages partnerships, so applications may support projects involving combined teams of agencies at all levels and including non-profit organizations. However, non-profit organizations cannot apply directly for JAG funding. Non-profit organizations may participate as a team member, with the government agency assuming overall responsibility and leadership for a project.

      Statutory Authority: FY21 (BJA - JAG State and JAG Local) Title I of Pub. L. No. 90-351 (generally codified at 34 U.S.C. 10151-10726), including subpart 1 of part E (codified at 34 U.S.C. 10151 - 10158); see also 28 U.S.C. 530C(a). Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.738

      Managing your Grant:

      Additional information may be found on the Colorado Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Information Page.

      The JAG program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

      Juvenile Diversion Program (DV)

      Purpose of the Funds: Per Colorado Statute, the goals of diversion are to prevent further involvement of a juvenile in the formal legal system (19-2-303 C.R.S.); provide eligible juveniles with cost-effective alternatives to adjudication that require the least amount of supervision and restrictive conditions necessary; reduce recidivism and improve positive outcomes for juveniles; and ensure appropriate services are available for all juveniles. 

      Juvenile diversion programs should, when possible, integrate restorative justice practices and utilize evidence-based practices to provide community-based alternatives to the formal court system for youth between the ages of 10-17, as an alternative to a petition filed or an adjudicatory hearing. Diversion programs should never deny diversion to a juvenile based on the juvenile's ability to pay, previous or current involvement with the Departments of Human or Social Services; age, race or ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or legal representation.

      Eligibility: The Colorado Children's Code establishes units of local government and non-governmental agencies as eligible agencies to receive these state funds.  Funds are allocated to each judicial district pursuant to CRS 19-2-303, based on a formula that consists of a percentage for juvenile-age population, poverty rate, and juvenile population per square mile.

      Statutory Authority: C.R.S. 19-2-303

      Managing your Grant:

      Additional information may be found on the State Juvenile Diversion Program (DV) information page.

      The DV program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA).

      Juvenile Formula/Title II (Formula)

        Purpose of the Funds: To assist communities in local efforts designed to enhance or respond to a variety of juvenile justice and delinquency issues. The fund is managed by the Governor-appointed Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Council, which establishes funding priorities. The monies are used for program development, policy design, research, and other activities.

        Eligibility:  Applicants include units of local government (including law enforcement, district attorneys, and judicial districts), state agencies, and non-profit/local private community-based agencies. Non-profit/local private agency applicants must provide documentation that the program being proposed was denied full funding or was given partial funding by a unit of local government, prior to the submission of this application.

        Statutory Authority: 34 USC 11131; title I of Public Law 90-351 (generally codified at 34 USC ch. 101); 28 USC 530C(a). Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.540

        Managing your Grant:

        Additional information may be found on the Juvenile Formula/Title II (Formula) Grant Program Information Page.

        The Formula Program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

        Law Enforcement Assistance Grant Program (LEAGP)

        Purpose of the Funds: The purpose of the Law Enforcement Assistance Grant Program is for law enforcement agencies to apply for grants up to the amount of money that the agency can establish that it would have received except for Section 16-13-306.5 or 16-13-504.5 C.R.S. Broadly, grant money is to be used for operations and investigations, training and education, equipment and supplies, joint community-based programs, support of community-based programs, or any other purpose that would have been permissible under federal equitable sharing guidelines (see the Guide to Equitable Sharing for State, Local, and Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies). Further, grant money can be used only to supplement and not supplant money received by the applicant agency from other sources.

        Eligibility: Seizing law enforcement agencies, as defined in Section 16-13-301 (2.7), eligible for reimbursement for money that the agency would have received except for section 16-13-306.5 or 16-13-504.5 C.R.S. One application per law enforcement agency per funding year will be permitted with the exception of law enforcement agencies serving as the fiscal agent for Multi-Jurisdictional Task Forces (MJTF) seeking reimbursement as individual agencies and then also as a fiscal agent of a MJTF.

        Statutory Authority: C.R.S. 16-13-301

        Managing your Grant:

        The LEAGP program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

        Law Enforcement Workforce Recruitment, Retention, and Tuition Grant Program

        Purpose of Funds: The Law Enforcement Workforce Recruitment, Retention, and Tuition Grant Program is designed to assist Law Enforcement Agencies in addressing workforce shortages, improve the training given to POST certified Peace Officers; and improve relationships between Law Enforcement and impacted communities
         
        Eligibility: The Law Enforcement Workforce Recruitment, Retention, and Tuition Grant Program is open Colorado law enforcement agencies, including those serving rural municipalities and counties, tribal law enforcement agencies that serve fewer than fifty thousand residents, third-party membership organizations on behalf of a law enforcement agency, and any state institution of higher education, as defined in section 23-18-102 (10), that operates a law enforcement academy

        Statutory Authority: C.R.S. 24-33.5-528. Law enforcement workforce recruitment, retention, and tuition grant program

        Managing your Grant: 

        Additional information may be found on the Law Enforcement Workforce Recruitment, Retention, and Tuition Grant Program information page.

        The program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

        Multidisciplinary Crime Prevention and Crisis Intervention Grant Program

        Purpose of Funds: The goal of the Multidisciplinary Crime Prevention and Crisis Intervention Grant Program is to support community-based, multidisciplinary approaches to crime prevention and crisis intervention strategies, specifically in areas where crime is disproportionately high.
         
        Eligibility: Eligible grant recipients include community-based organizations and nonprofit agencies, local law enforcement agencies, federally recognized tribes with jurisdiction in Colorado, local health or human service agencies, third-party membership organizations, or administrators on behalf of eligible grant recipients.

        Any third-party grant administrator shall: be a nonprofit organization in good standing with the secretary of state's office; have experience as a third-party administrator for a state, multistate, federal, or foundation grant program; be capable of providing a unified case management, financial, and data collection system related to services and payments received under the grant program; be capable of providing technical assistance and other organizational development services to grantees to improve  delivery of services, financial management, or data collection; and have experience and competency in working with underserved communities, particularly, communities of color.

        Statutory Authority: C.R.S. 24-33.5-527. Multidisciplinary crime prevention and crisis intervention grant program

        Managing your Grant: 

        Additional information may be found on the Multidisciplinary Crime Prevention and Crisis Intervention Grant Program information page.

        The program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

        National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP)

        Purpose of Funds: The National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP) was established in 1995 to aid states in improving the accuracy and completeness of state criminal history information. The goal of the NCHIP program is to ensure that accurate records are available for use in law enforcement, including sex offender registry requirements, and to protect public safety and national security. The program is administered at the federal level by the Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) and at the state level by the Division of Criminal Justice. CBI's Colorado Crime Information Center is the agency responsible for managing state criminal history data in Colorado.
         
        Eligibility: The National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP) program is open only to agencies that directly contribute data to the Colorado Computerized Criminal History (CCH) system and other supported systems. 

        Statutory Authority: 34 U.S.C. §10132(c)(19). Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.554

        Managing your Grant: 

        Additional information may be found on the National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP) Information Page.

        The NCHIP program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

        Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement Grant Program (COV)

          Purpose of Funds: The Paul Coverdell program is an on-going program funded through the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and is focused on improving the quality and timeliness of forensic science activities within the state.

          Eligibility: The State must have developed a plan for forensic sciences laboratories that is designed to improve the quality and timeliness of forensic science or medical examiner services and must specifically describe the manner in which grant funds will be used to carry out that plan. States are expected to consider the needs of laboratories operated by units of local government as well as those operated by the State. 

          Statutory Authority: 34 USC 10561-10566. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.742

          Managing your Grant:

          Additional information may be found on the Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement Grant Program (COV) Information Page.

          The COV program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

          Project Safe Neighborhood (PSN)

            Purpose of the Funds: Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is designed to create and foster safer neighborhoods through a sustained reduction in violent crime, including, but not limited to, addressing criminal gangs and the felonious possession and use of firearms.  The program's effectiveness depends upon the ongoing coordination, cooperation, and partnerships of local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies--and the communities they serve--engaged in a unified approach led by the U.S. Attorney in all 94 districts. 

            Eligibility: This is a limited competition grant program.  Applications will be accepted from law enforcement and other agencies providing relevant services in four Targeted Enforcement Areas (TEAs):  

            1. Denver Metro area
            2. Colorado Springs
            3. Northern Colorado including the cities of Fort Collins, Greeley, and Loveland
            4. Pueblo

            Category 1 and Category 2 applications will be accepted from law enforcement agencies* and from other organizations providing relevant services in Colorado within the four TEAs listed. Category 1 is for violence responsive programs to targeted law enforcement intervention aligned with the PSN strategy, of which 30% must be dedicated to activities of TEAs targeted on gang violence reduction efforts – specifically on the investigation and prosecution of criminal and/or transnational organizations that are engaged in high levels of violent crime, firearms offenses, human trafficking, and drug trafficking. Category 2 is for targeted re-entry and prevention activities.

            *A law enforcement agency serving as the fiscal agent for a Multi-Jurisdictional Task Force (MJTF) can apply both as an individual agency and then also as the fiscal agent of a MJTF.

            Statutory Authority: 34 U.S.C. 60701-60705. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number:16.609

            Managing your Grant:

            Additional information may be found on the Project Safe Neighborhood (PSN) information page.

            The PSN program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

            Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners Grant Application (RSAT)

              Purpose of the Funds:  To assist states and units of local government in developing and operating residential substance abuse programs for incarcerated adult and juvenile offenders in facilities operated by state and local correctional agencies. The Colorado RSAT project is designed to work specifically with the state’s statutory requirements for offender assessment, referral and treatment in substance abuse programs.

              Eligibility: Applicants for these funds must be state correctional facilities or local correctional and detention facilities, in which residential substance abuse treatment programs are being developed and implemented with inmates with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders or challenges and who are incarcerated for a period of time sufficient to permit substance abuse treatment. Of funding that may be allocated to local correctional and detention facilities, priority consideration will be given to support programs in rural and tribal areas.

              Statutory Authority: 34 U.S.C. § 20102. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.576

              Managing your Grant:

              Additional information may be found on the Residencial Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners Grant Application (RSAT) information page.

              The RSAT program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA)

              State’s Mission for Assistance in Recruiting and Training (SMART) Grant Program

              Purpose of Funds: The goal of the State’s Mission for Assistance in Recruiting and Training (SMART) Grant Program is to provide grants to law enforcement agencies to increase the number of P.O.S.T.-certified and non-certified law enforcement officers who are representative of the communities they serve and to provide training for those additional law enforcement officers.
               
              Eligibility: The State’s Mission for Assistance in Recruiting and Training (SMART) Grant Program is open to county or municipal law enforcement agencies, including those serving rural jurisdictions, which for this section means a county or municipality with a population of fewer than fifty thousand people according to the last federal census
              Tribal law enforcement agencies
              Third-party membership organizations on behalf of a law enforcement agency 

              Statutory Authority: C.R.S. 24-33.5-529. State's mission for assistance in recruiting and training (SMART) grant program

              Managing your Grant: 

              Additional information may be found on the State’s Mission for Assistance in Recruiting and Training (SMART) Grant Program information page.

              The program is administered by the DCJ Office of Adult and Juvenile Justice Assistance (OAJJA). 

              Victim Compensation

                Purpose of the Funds:   Provides funds to judicial districts to distribute to eligible victims.

                Eligibility: The Division of Criminal Justice (DCJ) Office for Victim Programs does not disburse Crime Victim Compensation funds directly to victims of crime. Funds are disbursed to judicial districts where the crime occurred. 

                Statutory Authority: 34 U.S.C. § 20102. Federal Assistance Listing (ALS) Number: 16.576

                Managing your Grant:

                The Victims Compensation program is administered by the DCJ Office for Victims Programs (OVP)

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